Misinformation, Science and Media

/Misinformation, Science and Media

Abstract

In this new, three-year programme, researchers from the Oxford Internet Institute and the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism will examine the interplay between systematic misinformation campaigns, news coverage, and increasingly important social media platforms for public understanding of science and technological innovation. In some key domains of public life there appears to be coordinated efforts to ruin the reputation of science and innovation. Scientists now protest in the streets just to get policymakers to embrace evidence-based policy making. Long-held consensus on the causes and consequences of climate change, tobacco-induced cancers, and value of public health strategies increasingly seem open for debate. We have political leaders who claim to be unable to discern what expert consensus is—even when experts organize to make explicit statements about levels of confidence and certainty around particular areas of research. Social media platforms have become a powerful venue for those aiming to deflating public support for action based on reliable research, and previously trusted technological innovations come to have negligible impact. In this three-year project, we will examine the interplay between systematic misinformation campaigns, news, and increasingly important social media platforms for public understandings of science and innovation. We aim to increase our understanding of the role of “junk science” and fake news in influencing—or even undermining—public understanding of scientific issues and develop evidence-based recommendations for scientists, journalists, and policymakers interested in effective science communication in the 21st century.

 

Details

Professor Philip Howard, University of Oxford
Funder: Oxford Martin School
Award: £844,510, 2017
Proposal Number: 2017-1
Dates: 2017-2019

 

 

 

2018-02-17T06:55:02+00:00 January 14th, 2018|Activities|