The Computational Propaganda Project

Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

Computational Propaganda Worldwide: Executive Summary

We’re very excited to announce the launch of our case study series on computational propaganda in 9 different countries. Find the executive summary, written by Sam Woolley and Phil Howard, here. The Computational Propaganda Research Project at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, has researched the use of social media for public opinion manipulation….

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Computational Propaganda in the United States of America: Manufacturing Consensus Online

As part of our new country case study series, project members Sam Woolley and Doug Guilbeault investigated the use of bots and other false amplifiers in the US. Abstract: Do bots have the capacity to influence the flow of political information over social media? This working paper answers this question through two methodological avenues: A)…

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Computational Propaganda in Poland: False Amplifiers and the Digital Public Sphere

As part of our new country case study series, project member Robert Gorwa investigated computational propaganda in Poland. Abstract: This report provides the first overview of political bots, fake accounts, and other false amplifiers in Poland. Based on extensive interviews with political campaign managers, journalists, activists, employees of social media marketing firms, and civil society…

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Computational Propaganda in Russia: The Origins of Digital Misinformation

As part of our new country case study series, project member Sergey Sanovich investigated the role of bots and other false amplifiers in Russia.  Abstract: Digital propaganda of the Russian government seeks to insulate Putin’s leadership from any domestic challengers and aid in his foreign policy ventures, which increasingly sets Russian interests off against the…

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Computational Propaganda in Germany: A Cautionary Tale

As part of our new country case study series, project member Lisa-Maria Neudert investigated computational propaganda in Germany. Political actors are using algorithms in efforts to sway public opinion. In some circumstances, the ways coded automation interacts with or affects human users are unforeseeable. In others, individuals and organizations build software that purposefully targets voters,…

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Computational Propaganda in Canada: The Use of Political Bots

As part of our new country case study series, project members Fenwick McKelvey and Elizabeth Dubois investigated the use of political bots in Canada. Are bots active in Canada? Yes. Are they influential? Maybe. Using a combination of quantitative social media analysis, content analysis of news articles and qualitative interviews, we study the use of…

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Computational Propaganda in China: An Alternative Model of a Widespread Practice

As part of our new country case study series, project member Gillian Bolsever investigated bots and other false amplifiers in China. Abstract: Computational propaganda is a growing issue in Western democracies, with evidence of online opinion manipulation orchestrated by robots, fake accounts and misinformation in many recent political events. China, the country with the most…

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Computational Propaganda in Taiwan: Where Digital Democracy Meets Automated Autocracy

As part of our new country case study series, project member Nick Monaco investigated computational propaganda in Taiwan. Abstract: Taiwan is a country with a rich history and cultural ties to mainland China. Though there has been much research and effort dedicated to propaganda and censorship in the People’s Republic of China over the years,…

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Computational Propaganda in Ukraine: Caught Between External Threats and Internal Challenges

As part of our new country case study series, project members Mariia Zhdanova and Dariya Orlova investigated the use of bots and other false amplifiers in Ukraine. Abstract: This working paper examines the state of computational propaganda in Ukraine, focusing on two major dimensions, Ukraine’s response to the challenges of external information attacks and the use…

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Computational Propaganda in Brazil: Social Bots During Elections

As part of our new country case study series, project member Dan Arnaudo investigated computational propaganda in Brazil. Abstract: Computational propaganda can take the form of automated accounts (bots) spreading information, algorithmic manipulation and the spread of fake news to shape public opinion, amongst other methods. These techniques are being used in combination with the…

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