The Computational Propaganda Project

Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

The Impact of Social Media on Political Debate (in Dutch)

The project’s research was featured in the Dutch Newspaper de Volskskrant. Sociale media en politiek activisme: even bracht het democratie 2.0 voort. Via de digitale weg bleken politici als Alexander Pechtold en Frans Timmermans plots bereikbaar voor de gewone man. Meer dan eens zijn massaprotesten en zelfs revoluties gefaciliteerd door Facebook en Twitter. Maar er…

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Algorithms, Automation and Politics (Fukuoka, Japan)

This is the first Workshop for the COMPROP project, and it will be organized as a pre-conference to the 2016 International Communication Association meetings in Fukuoka, Japan, on June 8th. Workshop Theme Recent research has revealed that political actors are using algorithms and automation in efforts to sway public opinion. In some circumstances, the ways…

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These are the Droids You’re Looking For: Bots as a Tool For Journalism

This originally appeared as “These are the Droids You’re Looking For:  Bots as a Tool For Journalism” by Samuel Woolley and Phil Howard on the National Endowment for Democracy’s Center for International Media Assistance Blog. In today’s data-saturated world journalists often struggle to report on many, if not most, of the potential stories that come across their…

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Prezi: Campaign Bots & The Law

Here is an interactive Prezi on our recent paper “Campaign Bots & The Law”, authored by Ryan Calo, Lisa Manheim, Sam Woolley and Phil Howard. It was presented at the Yale Information Society Project’s “Unlocking the Black Box” conference, and we identify the ways in which bots, when used by political campaign managers, may make…

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Presentations at SXSW 2016

Project Researchers Samuel Woolley and Phil Howard presented twice at SXSW this year. There was a “Book Reading” of Pax Technica: The “internet of things” is the expanding network of everyday objects—you can expect some 35 billion connected devices by 2020. The internet won’t be about your mobile phone or laptop anymore, it will be dominated…

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Automating Power: Social Bot Interference in Global Politics

Over the last several years political actors worldwide have begun harnessing the digital power of social bots — software programs designed to mimic human social media users on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Reddit. Increasingly, politicians, militaries, and government-contracted firms use these automated actors in online attempts to manipulate public opinion and disrupt organizational communication….

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Sam Woolley Speaks at Princeton

The project’s Sam Woolley presented some of the project’s research findings at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology and Policy. The video is available here.    

Botifesto: How To Think About Bots

This originally appeared as “How to Think About Bots” by Samuel Woolley, danah boyd, Meredith Broussard, Madeleine Elish, Lainna Fader, Tim Hwang, Alexis Lloyd, Gilad Lotan, Luis Daniel Placios, Allison Parrish, Gilad Rosner, Saiph Savage, and Samantha Shorey on February 23rd 2016 on Motherboard. We live in a world of bots. Generally speaking, these sets of…

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The Good, Bad, and Ugly of the World of Bots, and the Journalistic Implications of Using Them

The project’s research was covered by the Nieman Lab. Bot or not? Vice’s Motherboard has a piece up today — a “botifesto,” if you will (or if you must) — that gives a comprehensive rundown of just how useful, harmful, and ultimately inescapable bots are to our digital lives. Bots, “[g]enerally speaking these sets of…

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Curated Essays on Data & Society Points

Sam Woolley curated a collection of essays from a week-long workshop at Data & Society. The workshop brought together a group of experts to get a better grip on the questions that bots raise for public life: These essays can be found here. How to Think About Bots by Samuel Woolley, danah boyd, Meredith Broussard, Madeleine…

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