The Computational Propaganda Project

Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

Cyber Populism & Cyber Troops (Chatham House, London)

With social media strategy now an essential component of electioneering worldwide, election campaigns have developed increasingly sophisticated methods of maximizing the impact that the internet can have on the electorate. One such method is the artificial manipulation of social media output through botnets – automated software used to flood these channels with propaganda. The 2016…

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Computational Propaganda Worldwide (London, Washington, Palo Alto)

Our team presented the latest research about the manipulation of public opinion over social media in London to launch our case study series on Computational Propaganda Worldwide. This briefing helped ground a group conversation about the prospects for improving deliberative democracy and provided a first look at the Lab’s most recent research findings from a…

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COMPROP Briefing Tour (London, Washington DC, Palo Alto)

Our team presented the latest research about the manipulation of public opinion over social media. This briefing helped ground a group conversation about the prospects for improving deliberative democracy and provide a first look at the Lab’s most recent research findings from a series of country specific case studies. The event will include an executive…

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Algorithms, Automation and Politics (Fukuoka, Japan)

This is the first Workshop for the COMPROP project, and it will be organized as a pre-conference to the 2016 International Communication Association meetings in Fukuoka, Japan, on June 8th. Workshop Theme Recent research has revealed that political actors are using algorithms and automation in efforts to sway public opinion. In some circumstances, the ways…

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Curated Essays on Data & Society Points

Sam Woolley curated a collection of essays from a week-long workshop at Data & Society. The workshop brought together a group of experts to get a better grip on the questions that bots raise for public life: These essays can be found here. How to Think About Bots by Samuel Woolley, danah boyd, Meredith Broussard, Madeleine…

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How To Think About Bots (New York)

Sam Woolley coordinated a workshop on the implications of bots for public life, bringing together a community of scholars, activists, artists and policy thinkers.  The group debated the implications of bots for public life, and he curated a collection of Points/talking bots.  “What is the Value of a Bot?” is a series of essays from…

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