Political bots

Project on Algorithms, Computational Propaganda, and Digital Politics

In the News: ‘How social media filter bubbles and algorithms influence the election’

‘One of the most powerful players in the British election is also one of the most opaque. With just over two weeks to go until voters go to the polls, there are two things every election expert agrees on: what happens on social media, and Facebook in particular, will have an enormous effect on how the…

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Fake News is Widely Shared as the Real Thing

Nearly a quarter of web content shared on Twitter by users in the battleground state of Michigan during the final days of last year’s US election campaign was so-called fake news, according to a University of Oxford study. Researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute (OII) also determined that these users shared approximately as many fake…

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ComProp on MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show

Research by team members Bence Kollyani, Phil Howard, and Samuel Woolley was recently featured on the Rachel Maddow show. See more here:

Bring on the Bots

 (This originally appeared as “Bring on the Bots” on Civicist) Bots—particularly bots on social media—can’t seem to catch a break in the news lately. First, the Block Bot, a program designed to help Twitter users weed-out disliked content and people, simultaneously fell afoul of Richard Dawkins, members of the conservative press, and legal pundits. Next, an…

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Participation, Civics and Your Net Coffee Maker

(This is the prepublication version of Principal Investigator Phil Howard’s response to the article by Ethan Zuckerman “New Media, New Civics?” published in Policy & Internet (2014: vol. 6, issue 2).  Final version, with Zuckerman’s essay and other responses, here.) Ethan Zuckerman’s essay on participatory civics offers a nice example of how to push ideas forward with…

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