OII

/Tag:OII

IJOC: Keeping Ottawa Honest—One Tweet at a Time? Politicians, Journalists, Wikipedians and Their Twitter Bots

WikiEdits bots are a class of Twitter bot that announce edits made by Wikipedia users editing under government IP addresses, with the goal of making government editing activities more transparent. This article examines the characteristics and impact of transparency bots, bots that make visible the ...

2016-10-14T05:22:50+00:00 October 14th, 2016|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

IJOC: Political Communication, Computational Propaganda, and Autonomous Agents — Introduction

The Internet certainly disrupted our understanding of what communication can be, who does it, how, and to what effect. What constitutes the Internet has always been an evolving suite of technologies and a dynamic set of social norms, rules, and patterns of use. But the ...

2016-10-14T05:14:56+00:00 October 14th, 2016|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

Positions Filled: Three Research Appointments in Computational Social Science

**Update 23/09/2016 These posts have been filled, but we will likely advertise again, along similar themes, in a year. We are looking for three talented researchers to join our team of computational social scientists at Oxford.  Ideally, we'd like to have one person interested in the ...

2016-06-21T15:08:07+00:00 June 21st, 2016|Hiring|

These are the Droids You’re Looking For: Bots as a Tool For Journalism

This originally appeared as "These are the Droids You're Looking For:  Bots as a Tool For Journalism" by Samuel Woolley and Phil Howard on the National Endowment for Democracy's Center for International Media Assistance Blog. In today’s data-saturated world journalists often struggle to report on many, if ...

2016-04-04T00:21:29+00:00 April 4th, 2016|Public Scholarship|