The Computational Propaganda Project

Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

Twitter has a serious bot problem, and Wikipedia might have the solution

Robert Gorwa wrote a new commentary essay for Quartz on Twitter’s bot policy. Several research projects, including the Computational Propaganda Project at the Oxford Internet Institute (where I am a researcher), the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensics Lab, and the Observatory on Social Media at Indiana University have begun to document the central role of bot accounts in spreading hyper-partisan and misleading “news,”…

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What Facebook Knows

The project’s research and writing was discussed in Vice News. To answer these questions conclusively, academic researchers have said that Facebook could very easily clear the air by releasing more of its data. But just as the company keeps its algorithm under wraps, the company has thus far declined to share broad data about the…

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Tinder nightmares: the promise and peril of political bots

Project members Robert Gorwa and Doug Guilbeault published an article in Wired about the recent use of Tinder bots to target young swing voters in the lead up to the UK’s General Election. In the days leading up to the UK’s general election, youths looking for love online encountered a whole new kind of Tinder…

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Computational Propaganda in Poland: False Amplifiers and the Digital Public Sphere

As part of our new country case study series, project member Robert Gorwa investigated computational propaganda in Poland. Abstract: This report provides the first overview of political bots, fake accounts, and other false amplifiers in Poland. Based on extensive interviews with political campaign managers, journalists, activists, employees of social media marketing firms, and civil society…

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Facebook could tell us how Russia interfered in our elections. Why won’t it?

Team members Phil Howard and Robert Gorwa wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post which calls on Facebook to share important data on potential Russian interference in the 2016 US election, and touches on the importance of not just studying ‘fake news’, but also fake accounts and other false amplifiers. Read the full piece in the Washington Post.