The Computational Propaganda Project

Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

Russian Involvement and Junk News during Brexit

Several prominent UK politicians are concerned about the role of Russian troll and bot accounts in public conversation over social media during the Brexit debate in 2016. Looking at our archive of Twitter conversation we find that (1) the Russian Twitter accounts shared to the public, contributed relatively little to the overall Brexit conversation, (2)…

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Brexit: Pro-Leave Twitter Bots Played ‘Small But Strategic Role’ in EU Referendum Result, Says Oxford Study

Our case study series on computational propaganda worldwide was covered in the Independent: According to the University of Oxford study, social media sites need to redesign themselves in order to regain trust. “For democracies, we should assume that encouraging people to vote is a good thing. Promoting political news and information from reputable outlets is…

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Labour dominating Twitter discussions, researchers say

Our second UK Election memo was featured in the Guardian. Content about Labour is dominating Twitter in the run-up to the general election, according to a new study from the University of Oxford’s Internet Institute. The researchers, who have been tracking the changes in activity over time, looked at traffic on Twitter over the final…

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Brexit bots and the UK election

Our second UK General Election memo was covered by the FT. Some of the automated Twitter accounts, or ‘bots’, that were among the most prolific during the UK’s EU referendum campaign have turned their attention to the UK general election, tweeting with increased frequency about Ukip and Labour. Read the rest in the Financial Times.  

Social Media and News Sources during the 2017 UK General Election

Platforms like Twitter and sources like Wikipedia are important parts of the information diet for many citizens. In this data memo, we analyse Twitter data on bot activity and junk news for a week in the final stages of campaigning of the 2017 UK General Election and also present data on Wikipedia page consultations about…

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One in eight Twitter election shares ‘link to junk news’

Our project work was covered by the BBC. One in eight political stories shared on Twitter in the run-up to the general election is from a “junk news source”, research suggests. UK users shared one link from automated bot accounts promoting “junk” information for every four links to professionally produced news, according to the Oxford…

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Labour dominating election conversation on Twitter, study finds

The project’s work on the 2017 UK election was covered by the Guardian. The Labour party dominates the conversation on Twitter, with almost 40% of tweets on election-related hashtags, according to a study by the Oxford Internet Institute about social media in the run-up to the general election. By contrast, tweets about the Conservative party…

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Junk News and Bots during the 2017 UK General Election

Computational propaganda distributes large amounts of misinformation about politics and public policy over social media platforms. The combination of automation and propaganda can significantly impact public opinion during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected Twitter data on bot activity and junk news using a set of hashtags related to the 2017 UK…

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How social media filter bubbles and algorithms influence the election

Our project work was featured extensively in a Guardian article about the British Election. ‘One of the most powerful players in the British election is also one of the most opaque. With just over two weeks to go until voters go to the polls, there are two things every election expert agrees on: what happens…

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Watch out for the Brexit bots

The project’s research into the Brexit referendum was covered in Quartz. As the Brexit vote draws closer, undecided voters will need to make up their minds. Some will turn to friends and family. Others will turn to news channels. A piece of advice: Whatever you do, avoid Twitter. Out of 1.5 million tweets between June…

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