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10 search results found for 'bence bots'

Junk News and Bots during the German Parliamentary Election: What are German Voters Sharing over Twitter?


Automation and propaganda can significantly impact public life during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected Twitter data on bot activity and junk news using a set of hashtags related to the 2017 German Parliamentary Election for a ten-day period in September 2017. We find that (1) traffic about the far-right Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) accounts for a surprisingly large portion of Twitter activity given that party’s share of voter support. (2) The impact of political bots was minor overall, with highly automated accounts generating a small fraction of the Twitter traffic about the election, and most of the bots working in the service of the far-right AfD. (3) Finally, we find that German social media users shared four links to  professional news sources for every one link to junk news. Comparing across countries and over time, we demonstrate that this level of professional news consumption is consistently higher than is the case in the US and UK, but lower than in France, and that the level of automation in German Twitter increased only slightly between the Presidential election campaign of February 2017 and the Parliamentary election campaign of September 2017...

Junk News and Bots during the 2017 UK General Election


Computational propaganda distributes large amounts of misinformation about politics and public policy over social media platforms. The combination of automation and propaganda can significantly impact public opinion during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected Twitter data on bot activity and junk news using a set of hashtags related to the 2017 UK General Election for a week in May 2017. (1) Content about the Labour Party tended to dominate traffic on Twitter. (2) Automated accounts generated a relatively small amount of content about UK politics, and while this automation was spread fairly equally across parties, highly automated accounts associated with the Labour Party were more active in generating traffic. (3) Social media users in the UK shared four links to professional news and information for every one link to junk news. (4) In comparison to our study of similar trends in the US, Germany and France, we find that UK users shared better quality information than that which many US users shared, but worse quality news and information than German and French users shared...

Junk News and Bots during the French Presidential Election (Round II)


Computational propaganda distributes large amounts of misinformation about politics and public policy over social media platforms. The combination of automation and propaganda can significantly impact public opinion during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected Twitter data on bot activity and junk news using a set of hashtags related to the French presidential election for three days during the second round of campaigning. For our research on the first round of voting, see Data Memo 2014.3. (1) Content about Macron still dominates Twitter conversation about French politics, though the gap between Macron and Le Pen traffic has narrowed over time. (2) The proportion of traffic originating with highly automated accounts doubled between the first and second round of voting. (3) The ratio of links to professionally produced news content to other political content has gone from about 2 to 1 in the first round of voting to about 1 to 1 in the second round of voting. (4) Compared to our study of similar trends in the US, we find that Twitter users discussing French politics are sharing higher quality political news and information than many US users were sharing during the US Presidential election, but lower quality information than French users were sharing in the first round of voting and lower quality information than German users were sharing in the German Presidential election...

Junk News and Bots during the French Presidential Election (Round I)


Computational propaganda distributes large amounts of misinformation about politics and public policy over social media platforms. The combination of automation and propaganda can significantly impact public opinion during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected Twitter data on bot activity and junk news using a set of hashtags related to the French Presidential Elections for a week in March 2017. (1) Content about Macron tended to dominate the traffic on Twitter, but highly automated accounts occasionally generated large amounts of traffic about Hamon. (2) These automated accounts generate a small amount of content about French politics, though this amount is increasing over time. (3) Social media users in France shared many links to high quality political news and information, roughly at ratio of 2 links to professionally produced news for every link to other kinds of sources. (4) In comparison to our study of similar trends in the US and Germany, we find that French users are sharing better quality information than what many US users shared, and almost as much quality news and information as German users share...

Junk News and Bots during the German Federal Presidency Election: What Were German Voters Sharing Over Twitter?


Computational propaganda distributes large amounts of misinformation about politics and public policy over social media platforms. The combination of automation and propaganda can significantly impact public opinion during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected data on bot activity and junk news using a set of hashtags related to the German Federal Presidency Elections in February 2017. We find that (1) traffic about the far-right Alternative für Deutschland and their candidate Albrecht Glaser accounted for a surprisingly large portion of Twitter activity given their share of voter support. (2) Overall, the impact of political bots was minor, with highly automated accounts generating a small fraction of the Twitter traffic about the election. (3) Social media users in Germany shared many links to political news and information, and the ratio of professional news to junk news shared by German Twitter users was 4 to 1...

Junk News and Bots during the U.S. Election: What Were Michigan Voters Sharing Over Twitter?


Computational propaganda distributes large amounts of misinformation about politics and public policy over social media platforms. The combination of automation and propaganda can significantly impact public opinion during important policy debates, elections, and political crises. We collected data on automation and junk news using major hashtags related to politics in the state of Michigan in the lead up to the 2016 US Presidential Election. (1) In Michigan, conversation about politics over Twitter mirrored the national trends in that Trump-related hashtags were used more than twice as often as Clinton-related hashtags. (2) Social media users in Michigan shared a lot of political content, but the amount of professionally researched political news and information was consistently smaller than the amount of extremist, sensationalist, conspiratorial, masked commentary, fake news and other forms of junk news. (3) Not only did such junk news “outperform” real news, but the proportion of professional news content being shared hit its lowest point the day before the election...

Bots and Automation over Twitter during the U.S. Election


Bots are social media accounts that automate interaction with other users, and political bots have been particularly active on public policy issues, political crises, and elections. We collected data on bot activity using the major hashtags related to the U.S. Presidential Election. We find that that political bot activity reached an all-time high for the 2016 campaign. (1) Not only did the pace of highly automated pro-Trump activity increase over time, but the gap between highly automated pro-Trump and pro-Clinton activity widened from 4:1 during the first debate to 5:1 by election day. (2)  The use of automated accounts was deliberate and strategic throughout the election, most clearly with pro-Trump campaigners and programmers who carefully adjusted the timing of content production during the debates, strategically colonized pro-Clinton hashtags, and then disabled activities after Election Day...

Bots and Automation over Twitter during the Third U.S. Presidential Debate


Bots are social media accounts that automate interaction with other users, and political bots have been particularly active on public policy issues, political crises, and elections. We collected data on bot activity using the major hashtags related to the third U.S. Presidential debate. We find that automated pro-Trump accounts became even more aggressive in this final debate, with (1) highly automated pro-Trump accounts launching into content production hours ahead of rather than during the debate and (2) highly automated pro-Trump accounts out producing similar pro-Clinton accounts 7:1 on relevant hashtags.  However, we also find that (3) a large number of (human) users still use Twitter for relatively neutral political expression during the debate itself...

Bots and Automation over Twitter during the Second U.S. Presidential Debate


Bots are social media accounts that automate interaction with other users, and political bots have been particularly active on public policy issues, political crises, and elections. We collected data on bot activity using the major hashtags related to the U.S. Presidential debate. In this brief analysis we find that (1) Twitter traffic on pro-Trump hashtags was roughly double that of the pro-Clinton hashtags, (2) about one third of the pro-Trump twitter traffic was driven by bots and highly automated accounts, compared to one quarter of the pro-Clinton twitter traffic, (3) the significant rise of Twitter traffic around debate time is mostly from real users who generate original tweets using the more neutral hashtags. In short, Twitter is much more actively pro-Trump than pro-Clinton and more of the pro-Trump twitter traffic is driven by bots, but a significant number of (human) users still use Twitter for relatively neutral political expression in critical moments...