Research

/Research

Here are the books, scholarly articles, conference papers, and public writing from our team.

Japan’s 2014 General Election: Political Bots, Right-Wing Internet Activism, and Prime Minister Shinzō Abe’s Hidden Nationalist Agenda

Abstract: In this article, we present results on the identification and behavioral analysis of social bots in a sample of 542,584 Tweets, collected before and after Japan’s 2014 general election. Typical forms of bot activity include massive Retweeting and repeated posting of (nearly) the same message, ...

2017-12-14T11:42:29+00:00 December 14th, 2017|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

Detecting Bots on Russian Political Twitter

Abstract: Automated and semiautomated Twitter accounts, bots, have recently gained significant public attention due to their potential interference in the political realm. In this study, we develop a methodology for detecting bots on Twitter using an ensemble of classifiers and apply it to study bot activity ...

2017-12-14T11:40:08+00:00 December 14th, 2017|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

Improving Predictive Accuracy in Elections

Abstract: The problem of accurately predicting vote counts in elections is considered in this article. Typically, small-sample polls are used to estimate or predict election outcomes. In this study, a machine-learning hybrid approach is proposed. This approach utilizes multiple sets of static data sources, such as ...

2018-07-29T21:35:47+00:00 December 14th, 2017|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

Harvesting Social Signals to Inform Peace Processes Implementation and Monitoring

Abstract: Peace processes are complex, protracted, and contentious involving significant bargaining and compromising among various societal and political stakeholders. In civil war terminations, it is pertinent to measure the pulse of the nation to ensure that the peace process is responsive to citizens’ concerns. Social media ...

2017-12-14T11:31:58+00:00 December 14th, 2017|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

Fake News: A Technological Approach to Proving the Origins of Content, Using Blockchains

Abstract: In this article, we introduce a prototype of an innovative technology for proving the origins of captured digital media. In an era of fake news, when someone shows us a video or picture of some event, how can we trust its authenticity? It seems ...

2017-12-14T11:27:59+00:00 December 14th, 2017|Academic Articles, Journal Special Issues|

What to watch for when America’s tech giants testify on Russian hacking today

Sam Woolley and Doug Guilbeault wrote an article for Quartz which provides a breakdown of the recent testimony provided to congressional intelligence committees by Facebook, Twitter, and Google to the Senate. This week Twitter, Facebook, and Google will testify publicly before the US Congress about how the ...

2017-11-05T14:40:08+00:00 November 5th, 2017|Public Scholarship|

Twitter has a serious bot problem, and Wikipedia might have the solution

Robert Gorwa wrote a new commentary essay for Quartz on Twitter's bot policy. Several research projects, including the Computational Propaganda Project at the Oxford Internet Institute (where I am a researcher), the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensics Lab, and the Observatory on Social Media at Indiana University have begun to document ...

2017-10-24T13:19:08+00:00 October 24th, 2017|Public Scholarship|

Junk News on Military Affairs and National Security

Social media provides political news and information for both active duty military personnel and veterans. We analyze the subgroups of Twitter and Facebook users who spend time consuming junk news from websites that target US military personnel and veterans with conspiracy theories, misinformation, and other ...

2018-07-29T21:36:24+00:00 October 9th, 2017|Working Papers & Data Memos|

Social media companies must respond to the sinister reality behind fake news

Phil Howard and Bence Kollanyi wrote an opinion article for the Guardian, discussing the project's latest research and how social media companies could "design for deliberation." Social media companies such as Facebook and Twitter have begun to share evidence of how their platforms are used and ...

2017-10-05T15:06:25+00:00 October 5th, 2017|Public Scholarship|